Diamond Query: Hyper-focusing on Crown and Pavilion Angles to Maximize the Diamond’s Light


| Anonymous Reader


I’ve been looking at James Allen site. Would you please give your suggestions on the specs below. Looking for best bang for buck for:

 

GIA or AGS

1.30 to 1.50

Round brilliant cut

Excellent cut

H or I

High polish and symmetry rating

SI1 or higher

Lots of sparkle

Eye clean

Not foggy, hazy, milky or cloudy

Tiffany 4 prong 14 carat white gold

$7000. Including setting

 

Your Diamond Teacher |

 

Thank you for your inquiry. I am happy to help. Your criteria looks good. I would suggest picking out diamonds from the James Allen site and email me with the links so I can help advise on specific diamonds.

 

 

| Anonymous Reader


Ok thank you. What are your thoughts on floueresence? All I know is high appears blue in black light and that isn’t good, none is preferable but is any ok?

Here are a few I’m looking at. I can’t get my mind wrapped around what to choose as far as depth and table and girdle l/w and l/wd

 

5009266 $7060 1.31 strong flour.

James Allen 5009266

 

4478569 $7350 sold?

James Allen 4478569

 

4728999 $7360 1.31 strong flour

James Allen 4728999

 

4451142 $7060 1.30 no flour

James Allen 4451142

 

4777042 $6400 1.30 cut & polish very good no fluorescence

James Allen 4777042

 

 

Your Diamond Teacher |

 

Fluorescence in a diamond can be a positive and negative thing. It can make a warmer color diamond appear whiter. And diamonds with fluorescence are priced more competitively than diamonds without fluorescence. Also, some people think it looks neat when the diamond glows blue under strong UV light.

Strong fluorescence can make a diamond appear hazy or oily. Reducing the diamonds sparkle. But you won't know until you see the diamond in person. I would suggest, if you are okay with fluorescence, then you should look at medium or faint.

Regarding diamond cut, as long as the diamond is graded and excellent cut by GIA, you will have a diamond that falls within the preferred range for it's proportions/angles.

If you want to really hyper focus on these measurements, then you can pay more close attention to the crown and pavilion angle, since these are two critical angles to maximize a diamonds light reflection. The closer the pavilion angle is to 40.75 and the closer the crown angles is to 34.5 the more optimal the light reflection and sparkle.

Two of the below diamonds is marked as “not available”, sku 4478569 and sku 4728999. Did you put one on hold?

 

James Allen 4478569

James Allen 4728999

 

 

| Anonymous Reader


I just purchased 4728999 but it has no fluorescence. Hope I didn’t mess up!

 

James Allen 4728999

 

Your Diamond Teacher |

 

You made a great decision! Rest assured! You will love this diamond. You did not “mess up”. LOL. Congratulations. I'd love to hear back from you once you receive it!

 

 

 

Diamond Query: Hyper-focusing on Crown and Pavilion Angles to Maximize the Diamond's Light
What do you think about this article?

About 

Sebastian Naturski loves to write about diamonds and share his knowledge with his readers.
When he is not working on his website he is studying law at Humboldt University of Berlin.
He has taken part in several international law competitions and likes to broaden his horizons.
His other big passion are languages. He is fluent in German, English, Polish and Japanese and got basic skills in French and Spanish as well.